Biggest uncut diamond in history found in Botswana

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Biggest uncut diamond in history found in Botswana
Biggest uncut diamond in history found in Botswana

A Canadian mining corporation unearthed a diamond bigger than the size of a tennis ball being the second-biggest uncut diamond discovered in history.

The largest diamond extracted from earth was the 3,106-carat Cullinan, a gem that was later used for the Crown Jewels. Yesterday, April 25, it was reported that the second-biggest uncut diamond in accounts has been uncovered in Botswana by a Canadian mining company, Lucara Diamond Corporation.

Lucara Diamond Corp revealed the 1,758-carat diamond, with a size bigger than a tennis ball and a mass of about 352g (12.42 ounces). Lucara reported that this is another company breakthrough beating their own record from Nov. 2015.

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The Lucara struggled to sell its 1,109-carat “Lesedi La Rona”, the previous discover from Nov. 2015, for about two years. In the end, it was purchased by British dealer Graff Diamonds for $53 million. 67 gems were created from the stone as reported by Forbes.

After the reveal of its latest extraction, Lucara’s shares peak at 11.4%, the highest in more than two months as compared to the 6.3% before close up.

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The diamond is the second largest diamond in history, next to Cullinan found near Pretoria of South Africa back in 1905.

Cullinan was finished into two precious gems; the Great Star of Africa and the Lesser Star of Africa, both of which were a feature in Britain’s Crown Jewel

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According to Lucara, due to the introduction of advanced technology the company has unearthed multiple precious diamonds, 12 stones of over 300 carats including the 72-carat and 327-carat diamond last April 2018.

“Karowe has now produced two diamonds greater than 1,000 carats in just four years, affirming the coarse nature of the resource and the likelihood of recovering additional, large, high-quality diamonds in the future.” Eira Thomas, the company’s chief executive officer, said.

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