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Queen afternoon tea

Visitors to Madame Tussauds can now have afternoon tea with a waxwork of the Queen (Image: PA)

Popular waxwork tourist attraction Madame Tussauds in London has launched a new dining experience called Royal Tea, where visitors can take a break from their star-studded day and enjoy a spot of tea in the company of the Queen at a garden party.

They will be treated to a traditional afternoon plate of fresh cakes, sandwiches and scones while sipping tea from fine china in the company of the Queen’s waxwork.

The set, hidden within Madame Tussauds, is modelled on the grounds of Buckingham Palace, with a video screen showing the Red Arrows flying past.

Visitors will also experience immersive sounds and special effects, with the Queen’s beloved corgi dogs seen and heard in the background.

For £15, they will be served smoked salmon or egg mayonnaise sandwiches, Victoria sponge and brownie cakes, and scones with clotted cream and jam, washed down with a cup of Earl Grey tea.

Visitors can also pay an additional £6 for a glass of prosecco during their experience.

Grant Harrold, a former butler to Prince Charles, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, Prince William and Prince Harry, posed alongside the waxwork of the Queen at the Royal Tea attraction on Friday.

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Also widely known as ‘The Royal Butler, the etiquette expert praised the attraction as the next best thing to actually having tea with the Queen.

He said: “I know a lot of people who want to meet the royals, so it’s the closest that some people are going to get,” he said.

“The way she’s dressed and everything is exactly how you imagine her. If you can’t meet the Queen in real life, you have to come to Madame Tussauds.

“When it comes to traditions and etiquette, we can see they do it beautifully every day.”

In March, Mr Harrold broke ranks for the first time to reveal that the Queen likes her brew made with tea in first (TIF) not milk in first (MIF) for the perfect cuppa.

Queen afternoon tea

Visitors will be treated to sandwiches, cakes and scones (Image: PA)

He told Express.co.uk: “I am sure the Queen enjoys her Assam or her Earl Grey the traditional way, made with tea leaves in a teapot and poured into a fine bone china teacup.

“She will also use a strainer. It is also a myth that members of Royalty use their pinky when drinking, I have never seen that happen once.”

Mr Harrold is also known as the Defender of Etiquette and Britain’s Official Etiquette Expert, both in the UK and around the world.

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In 2014, he was appointed as the personal aide to Princess Katarina of Yugoslavia and Serbia, helping with the day-to-day running of the Royal household.

While the Queen’s penchant for tea is now out in the open, putting tea in first has been the proper way of brewing the beverage since the 18th century.

Queen afternoon tea

Grant Harrold revealed how the Queen likes her tea (Image: GETTY)

English potter Josiah Spode decided china tea cups should be made using animal bone to ensure they didn’t crack under intense heat.

From then on, Royals and the elite would pour the tea in first to celebrate their expensive china and demonstrate status, whilst people of lower classes would have to keep putting milk in first to stop their cheaper crockery from cracking.

In March, Mr Harrold broke ranks for the first time to reveal that the Queen likes her brew made with tea in first (TIF) not milk in first (MIF) for the perfect cuppa.

He told Express.co.uk: “I am sure the Queen enjoys her Assam or her Earl Grey the traditional way, made with tea leaves in a teapot and poured into a fine bone china teacup.

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“She will also use a strainer. It is also a myth that members of Royalty use their pinky when drinking, I have never seen that happen once.”

Mr Harrold is also known as the Defender of Etiquette and Britain’s Official Etiquette Expert, both in the UK and around the world.

In 2014, he was appointed as the personal aide to Princess Katarina of Yugoslavia and Serbia, helping with the day-to-day running of the Royal household.

While the Queen’s penchant for tea is now out in the open, putting tea in first has been the proper way of brewing the beverage since the 18th century.

English potter Josiah Spode decided china tea cups should be made using animal bone to ensure they didn’t crack under intense heat.

From then on, Royals and the elite would pour the tea in first to celebrate their expensive china and demonstrate status, whilst people of lower classes would have to keep putting milk in first to stop their cheaper crockery from cracking.

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